Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Renoir - Impressionist Artist


Pierre-Auguste Renoir, an artist who documented the times in which he lived and painted. . .


Pierre-Auguste Renoir, PD/WC, Artist, c.1878


Renoir, a French artist 1841-1919, was one of the leading painters in the Impressionist style. He celebrated beauty, in particular feminine sensuality. Born in Limoges, France to a working class family, he was part of a golden moment in art.

In 1862, Renoir was living in Paris. He met Alfred Sisley, Frederic Bazille, and Claude Monet. A new art movement was beginning and these men were at the forefront. Renoir started exhibiting paintings at the Paris Salon in 1864, but recognition would remain elusive for another ten years. The early years were lean.

Renoir's paintings are known for their vibrant colour and subject matter. In the late 1860s, using the technique, en plein air (in the outdoors), Auguste and his friend Claude Monet experimented by painting the same scenes side by side, each showing his perception of the same subject. He is also known for his paintings of female nudes.

Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette (Bal du moulin de la Galette) 1876, is shown below. A popular dance garden, this place was on the Butte Montmartre near Renoir's residence.



Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette, 1876, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, PD/WC


In 1882, Auguste Renoir met and painted the portrait of Richard Wagner, the German composer, at Wagner's home. Later that year, he convalesced in Algeria for six weeks. He had contracted pneumonia, severe enough to permanently damage his respiratory system. But he kept painting.

Renoir married Aline Victorine Charigot, who, along with a few of Auguste's friends served as a model for Le Déjeuner des canotiers - Luncheon of the Boating Party, 1881.  After his marriage, Renoir painted many scenes of his family life. His wife, sons and other household staff were immortalized in several paintings. 

In 1907, Renoir moved to the warmer climate of Cagnes-sur-Mer, close to the Mediterranean coast. He had rheumatoid arthritis and was wheelchair-bound, but he continued to paint during the last twenty years of his life.





Moulin de la Galette, Montmartre, by DG Hudson


The property in the photograph above is now privately owned, but the top of the windmill still indicates what once existed here. As we walked past this landmark, I tried to detect the strains of French music, or the sound of people dancing and laughing, just like the painting.

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Have you heard of Renoir or have you seen any of his work? Did you know he was a good friend of Monet's? Please share in the comments. If you're doing the A to Z, good luck with the last half!

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References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre-Auguste_Renoir the Artist

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impressionism About Impressionism

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bal_du_moulin_de_la_Galette About the painting and location

PD=Public Domain
WC=Wikipedia Commons

Photo of Renoir:
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons. This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

Photo of Painting: Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons. This work is in the public domain in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 90 years or less.

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26 comments:

  1. It would be really neat to visit places captured by some famous artist.

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    1. I like to visit writer and artist 'hot spots' I call them, if they relate to my faves. We saw Van Gogh's home, Bateau Lavoire (Picasso's early home), and Monet's house in Giverny. It's fun to imagine and photograph these places.

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  2. I love the impressionists and I saw a modest exhibit at the Seattle Art Museum in 1999. Beautiful paintings.

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    1. Seattle does get some great art shows, better than our VAG (Vancouver Art Gallery).

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  3. Renoir is my favorite artist. I have quite a few of his prints hanging on the walls of my house.

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    1. I love his work, and the fact that he made the ordinary beautiful. . .

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  4. I love Renoir and Monet, too. I didn't know they were friends. (I also have a soft spot for Rousseau although he's not an Impressionist.)
    Great post!

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    1. They both had such sensitivity to colour, and less pomp and circumstance than the classic style. I like so many French artists, it hard to choose.

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  5. I love Renoir! What a terrific post,the painting you displayed is one of my favourites. I would love to see Van Gogh's house! He's one of my fave painters as well. It must have been amazing.
    Have you ever been to Pere LaChaise?...don't know if I'm spelling it correctly, I'm talking about the cemetary where they have people from Chopin, to Jim Morrison..it would be something to see, that's for sure.
    I did get to go to Stephen Leacock's house in Ontario. That was pretty cool.

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    1. I'll clarify that we saw Van Gogh house from the outside, it may now belong to someone else. A plaque outside commemorates. You knew about his brother Theo? We visited Oscar Wilde's monument, Edith Piaf's, Bizet, and a few others. It was an awe inspiring place. Here's the URL for the post I wrote about it:

      http://dghudson.blogspot.ca/2012/01/paris-pere-lachaise-cemetery.html

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  6. I have heard of Renoir although I'm not a huge fan of his work. I think that's interesting that he and Monet painted the same scene. I would've liked to watch.

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    1. I think Monet had a more delicate touch, but I do like Renoir's use of colour.

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  7. I am a HUGE fan of the impressionist style and have spent many hours in the Musee d'Orsay admiring the great masters. I've also been to the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Nantes, which is not too far from where I live and they have a couple C. Monet paintings on display, one of them being Le Bassin aux nymphéas. But I also a fan of Renoir (as you mentioned) Degas, and Manet, as well as one of my all time favorites, V Van Gogh even though he was post impressionism, I think. . . Anyway, all that to say I love this post. (:

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    1. We spent a few hours in the Musee d'Orsay when we visited, but no photos were allowed, so we took the time to savor the experience. We had crepes outside the museum at one of the crepe vendors.

      I'd love to visit the Musee des Beaux-Arts de Nantes one day. The Picasso gallery was closed for renos, when we were there. Glad you liked the post, Elise.

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  8. To bring you to my world of board gaming: Look up the game Pastiche.

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    1. I looked up Pastiche, Julie, and it's an interesting board game. I wonder how I'd do with all my art background. I'm impressed that this increases the players knowledge of art work. Thanks for the info and glad to see you here, stranger.

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  9. Renoir and Monet are my favorite artists of all time.

    www.modernworld4.blogspot.com

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    1. They are two of my faves, too, Gina! Thanks for stopping by.

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  10. Brilliance and so much of his work is a gift..there is something to be sad, about beauty n' pain! He lived it~
    Thank you for sharing him :D

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    1. I think his passion outweighed his pain, Ella.

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  11. I had no idea he and Monet were friends. Sounds like the last years were very painful for him, but love of his art was stronger.

    Shannon at The Warrior Muse

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    1. Just as writers hung together, artists did the same. Would we still try to write if it hurt to do so?

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  12. This is an interesting tit-bit on his life. Wheel-chair bound and still painting. That's quite an achievement, not in the physical sense but the mental.

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  13. His paintings are beautiful. Many great artists faced numerous challenges. Still their creativity could not be stifled. Your bio on him is intriguing.

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